E is for Engineering and Everything Information is for teachers (and parents) of K-5.

2017.9.29

what how why

  • toy car on a ramp * goes faster if the ramp is steeper * increase the angle * gravity, less distance along for distance down, less friction on shorter distance
  • basketball free throw * standard distance and height, weight and size of ball, net opening, distance from the backboard * force propelling the ball through the air * directly into the net frame * off the frame * off the backboard into the net * force direction friction gravity

2017.8.24

  • Asashi univ engineering guans. 30-40% women
  • Outreach. Girls schools. Summer experience go high school. Includes social responsibility.
  • Matter. Material. Resources

Bioengineering

Measurement
Estimation
Simple machines
Material
Structures
Engineering design process. Stepwise improvement.
Electronics
Computers. Control. Imbedded
Engineering careers.
Transportion. Marine. Environmental.
Products. Manufacturing

STEAM
Toys
Hats. Shoes.
K3 math / word games
Playground structure
Google engineering fair
Robot dance party
Community service
Assembly line with multiple robots. Relay race. Sense communicate.

Jobs. Finding company fit. Not just work.

Edison. Microbric
Sphero . Edu app
Make it big and put it on the floor. Robot follow path. Shapes
Automation. Door open. Use sensor challenges Paper towel dispenser
Failure is real. Doesn’t work so fix it.

Parallel learning. Learn 2 things at once. Demonstrate heart blood flow. regular irregular

Australian lessons. Math and music. Frequency notes. Hz chart pause
Tech and real world e.g. Auciustic engineering.

Storytelling. Acting. Prop. Characters. 3 little pigs. Complexity. Self-correcting.

Slow down.
Robot dance party.
Balloon battle bots. Competitive pop balloon. Iterative. ? Solo cup has to be on
Phil video. Edison
Railroad crossing. Conveyor belt.

5-10 minutes. Tutorials. Them design challenge. Video to prove it can be done. See what is possible. Get started.
Edison. Bar code program. Drive over than do it.

Teachingforward blog
Pgrigon.
Meetedison com. Pinterest.
Sphero
Beyondthehourofcode
My paperless classroom. Toy hacking curriculum.

Creekside wp. Spatial

I really want k-3 teachers to understand that engineering is everywhere and STEM starts here. Top down from applied to basic concepts


k-3

  • teaching 2-3
  • EiE https://eie.org/eie-curriculum – lessons – integrate with science
  • volusia 2, 3 curriculum map
  • eGFI lessons resources
  • stories, examples of teaching,
  • interviews – teachers, The Tech ed staff, curriculum developers, trainers
  • engineering design process, “failure”, problems, failure analysis, evaluation, improvement
  • learning from failure – f-word – strategies, wording, support, intervention, right answer
  • Q preparation profdev to teach eng lesson – EiE, other

large repository of everyday engineering bites / bytes

  • send out one a day
  • search for everyday object – household item, toy, community
  • search engineering word – concept, device
  • browse lists, categories

some examples

byte

  • Escalators are basically just long conveyor belts. They have rotating chains that pull a set of stairs in a constant cycle, creating a moving staircase. With this basic circular motion, they are able to move many people a short distance quickly. Escalators are often featured in areas where many people need to move between two areas quickly but where elevators would be impractical. For example, escalators are commonly found in department stores, shopping malls, hotels, airports, subways, stadiums, and other public buildings. Despite their size and cost, escalators are actually fairly simple machines.
    • https://readable.io/text/ Average Grade Level 12.2 Word Count 93
    • + around 100 words – lower readability, even though likely to be read by teacher, parent

 

  • Engineers design running shoes for protection, performance, and comfort. Engineers understand how much force travels from the ground through the shoe to the foot. Through the work of engineering, weight is distributed throughout the whole foot — heel to toe.

 

  • The Hoover Dam, built along the Colorado River between 1931 and 1936 reaches 726 feet in height (221 metres).
    • – more information

There are currently two problems to address.

  • girls start losing interest in STEM by third grade (AAUW research)
  • K-5 teachers mostly have no help spreading the word about Engineering, even though they talk about and teach about everyday things where they could include regular quick references to engineering.

These are discussion prompts, so teachers can take a few minutes to point out engineering in the context of regular lessons. With a sentence or two of background, teachers have enough to spend less than 5 minutes integrating engineering into regular lessons.

Big topics are everyday things that fit into K-5. Then lots of questions, short descriptions with links, some pictures, headings and standardized format, some high level information about engineering, links to activities.

  • reader is a grownup
  • broad range of topics
  • easy to make connection to engineering
  • ideas and conversation starters
  • interesting problems, engineering solutions
  • adequate information in “snippet’ to formulate own discussion
  • local examples, global awareness, issues for humanity
  • engineering throughout history
  • resources provided to research more deeply, locate lesson plans
  • quick scan page, enough to be interesting, not overwhelming
  • engineering-lite – enough to make the connection between people, places and things and some engineering basics – inclined plane, wheels, levers
  • vocabulary – engineering descriptions are usually more precise than “regular” words for similar thing

Yikes. Reluctant to start into Pinterest. I only have 5 minutes! I’ll get back to it when I can spare a couple of hours.


Engineering “book” – information and resources for K-5 teacher and parents
These are some ideas for engineering related information for parents and teachers to kickoff engineering exploration. Interesting, informative, not scary. Not lesson plans. Conversation starters, questions,… somethings to think about.

E is for Engineering and Everything

  • provide k-5 classroom teachers, families and informal educators with an overview of the amazing engineering we see and use everyday, so they can share this with kids.
  • That’s Engineering. * people, places and things, a wide variety of everyday problems that we encounter, examples of solutions highlighting the engineering that goes on behind the scenes to bring these to life.
  • Explore – What’s the problem?
  • Examples – What can it do? * solutions
  • Engineering – How did they do that? How does it work?

Topics will include familiar examples of engineering in everyday life as well as some challenges for humanity.

  • food, water, clothing, housing, sanitation, education, healthcare, personal care, essential furnishings, transportation, communication, laundry * kids – infants, toys, games *families, community, celebration *improvement, exploration, discovery

Sample http://engineering4kids.wikispaces.com/Food

I have looked around but there doesn’t seem to be anything in this space. Lots of great lesson plans but many need a lot of preparation work. Several great sites with activities for parents that are great for 2-3 kids.

Scenario – Teacher wants to introduce engineering in small increments – notice what we take for granted. Start with short class discussion. Picks a topic – Food. Skims through the Food page. Picks a subtopic – refrigeration. Reads definition, maybe article associated with refrigeration. What does it do? What is life like without it? Uses questions in the topic or comes up with own as appropriate for class.

Other uses

  • basis for projects, research about topics
  • keywords, ideas to search for lesson plans

  • provide k-5 classroom teachers, families and informal educators with an overview of the amazing engineering we see and use everyday, so they can share this with kids.
  • That’s Engineering. * people, places and things, a wide variety of everyday problems that we encounter, examples of solutions highlighting the engineering that goes on behind the scenes to bring these to life.

Explore – What’s the problem?

Examples – What can it do? * solutions

Engineering – How did they do that? How does it work?