3 deserts of Chennai

Design a Dessert – Find out what a design engineer does as you design and construct a dessert!

DESIGN A DESSERT

Description
Find out what a design engineer does as you design and construct a dessert.
Maximum Number of Girls of per Classroom:
Minimum Number of Volunteers:
Supplies needed for each girl or group
Notebook Page Worksheet
Purchase Order Worksheet
Pen/Pencil
Graph Paper
Paper plate
Plastic spoons and knives
Assorted dessert “building” supplies available for each girl in paper cup
Discussion Questions Worksheet
Hand Sanitizer and Wipes
Introduction/Background

PREPARATION DAY OF
Divide supplies into small paper cups and determine ‘pricing’

What is Engineering Design?
“To design is to imagine and specify things that don’t exist, usually with the aim of bringing them into the world.” -Herbert A. Simon

Discuss the design life cycle. (See power point or outline below)
Steps of the Engineering Design Process
Step 1: Problem Definition
-Identify the need
-Develop specifications or constraints
Step 2: Research the need or problem (gather information)
Step 3: Develop possible solutions
Step 4: Evaluate solutions and select the best possible one
Step 5: Construct a prototype or model
Step 6: Test and evaluate solution
Step 7: Communicate the solution
Step 8: Redesign and reiterate until problem is solved

Have the girls break into groups of 2. They will be creating the dessert for their partner per the to be discussed requirements. The students will then design a dessert within a budget to meet the requirements. Each student will then build to the requirements and follow up with test and evaluation of how well they met the requirements.

Instructions
-Find a partner.
-Follow the steps on the Notebook Page.
Follow-up/Additional Activities
The instructor should relate how this design cycle is used by engineers on a variety of product designs.

The discussion questions on their sheets:
Did you get a dessert that you liked? What did you like/dislike about it?
What would you have done differently if you had made the dessert yourself?
Did you feel that you and your partner communicated effectively? Why or why not?
Did you find any aspects of the project difficult?
-If you could do the whole process over again, what would you do differently?

Clean –up
Can be messy, be sure to clean desks thoroughly between sessions.

You are responsible for returning any non-opened perishable items to the store. Any open perishable items can be taken home with approval from Module Captain or Event Chair.
Costs
Printing paperwork
Pens/Pencils
Graph Paper
Paper Plates
Paper Cups
Plastic spoons/knives
‘Building Supplies’
Cleaning supplies
Helpful Comments

Name _

Team Number_

DESIGN A DESSERT NOTEBOOK PAGE

Step 1: Problem Definition (This one’s done for you!)
Identify a Need or Problem: I want to learn about engineering design, and I like dessert!
Develop Specifications & Constraints: Time for each design step is limited to what is shown below. Supplies are limited to what’s on the table. Budget for purchasing supplies is limited to €5.00. Must design a dessert that my partner will enjoy.

Step 2: Research the Need or Problem (Information Gathering)—3 minutes per partner
First, interview your partner. Find out what she likes and dislikes. What are some of her favorite desserts? What does she particularly like about them? Is it the flavor? Is it the texture? Is it the way it looks? Try to get a sense of what your partner wants in a dessert.

Step 3: Develop Possible Solutions—7 minutes (partners work simultaneously)
Make your way to the supply table (no talking with your partner now!). Make a list of ingredients that you think your partner may like. Try to think of creative ways to put the ingredients together. Use the graph paper provided to sketch one or more possible desserts that you want to propose to your partner. If you’re less artistically inclined, you can write a verbal description of your design solutions. Make sure all of your possible solutions can be constructed within your €5.00 budget. PLEASE DO NOT CONSULT WITH YOUR PARTNER DURING THIS PROCESS! Use what you learned in Step 2 to design things you think your partner will enjoy.

Step 4: Evaluate Solutions and Select Best Possible—3 minutes per partner
Get back together with your partner and present your design drawings or descriptions to her. Allow her to select the dessert she likes the best. Your partner may also suggest modifications to your design, but it is up to YOU, the designer, to settle on the final product that will fit within your budget.

Step 5: Construct a Prototype or Model—5 minutes (partners work simultaneously)
Fill out your purchase order with the items you need to construct your final design, and take it to the supply table. Build your design WITHOUT INPUT FROM YOUR PARTNER!

Step 6: Test and Evaluate the Solution—2 minutes (partners work simultaneously)
Give your dessert to your partner to taste-test! Don’t forget to fill out your discussion questions sheet as you enjoy your dessert!

Step 7: Communicate the Solution—3 minutes per partner
Discuss with your partner what she liked or disliked about the dessert you designed for her.

Step 8: Redesign and Reiterate until Problem Solved
What changes would you incorporate if you could redesign the dessert for your partner? Discuss these changes with your partner.

Name _

Team Number_

DESIGN A DESSERT PURCHASE ORDER

Indicate your supply order below, take it to the supply table, and one of the vendors will fill it for you. You have a budget of €5.00 (that’s five e-dollars). Any remaining balance in that budget will not be refunded, so get as close as you can without going over!

ITEM DESCRIPTION
QUANTITY
PRICE EACH
(in €)
TOTAL

GRAND TOTAL (not to exceed €5.00):

Name _

Team Number___

DESIGN A DESSERT DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Did you get a dessert that you liked? What did you like/dislike about it?

What would you have done differently if you had made the dessert yourself?

Did you feel that you and your partner communicated effectively? Why or why not?

Did you find any aspects of the project difficult?

If you could do the whole process over again, what would you do differently?

  • IGEW 3/28/2015

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